Blog

Welcome to our New Dentist and New Hygienist

We wanted to write to you to let you know some exciting developments at Fellows Dental Practice.

You may have been in recently and noticed some building work going on, and we thank you for your patience during this time.

So – what have we been doing? Thanks to your loyalty and recommendations of your family and friends to we have increased our patients numbers and are excitied to announce we have added a third Surgery upstairs and created a new larger area for the cleaning and sterilisation for all of our instruments creating a new state of the art decontamination suite.

We are extremely happy to announce the arrival of two new additional members to our team – Nisar Parekar and Sylanna Vanyik.

Nisar will be our new dentist and Sylanna our new hygienist.

Nisar joins us with a wealth of experience having worked in general dental practice for over 16 years; for the past 10 years he has been working in Uckfield in a family friendly practice.

He is a lovely friendly, empathetic man who pays great attention to detail, providing an excellent quality of dentistry with a gentle caring attitude.

Nisar is great photographer in his spare time and enjoys keeping fit having even completed marathons for charity! He loves travelling and has been on motorbike trips across Europe, Western USA and The Himalayas – which I am sure he will enjoy telling you many exciting tales about!

To compliment Nisar’s general dental skills he has a particular interest in Aesthetic Dentistry, Cosmetic Adult Orthodontics (braces) and Dental Implants. In line with our practice ethos of continuing professional development, one of Nisar’s attributes is his keen interest in lifelong learning, he has completed a variety of postgraduate courses – most recently he was awarded a Diploma in Dental Implants at the prestigious Eastman Dental Institute in London.

Initially Nisar will work Mondays and Thursdays with an aim to build up to full time.

Sylanna joins us in January working alongside Jennifer our current Hygeinist. Sylanna graduated from University College London and is a dynamic and enthusiastic hygienist. Sylanna is an exceptionally gentle and caring individual, she is full of energy and with her excellent communication skills she can connect with all kinds of people to inspire and encourage them to improve their habits.

In Sylanna’s spare time she enjoys spending time with her family and friends and pursing her hobbies of horse riding and exploring new cultures!

Initially Sylanna will work on Thursdays and Fridays, building on more days in the future.

We are very much looking forward to Nisar and Sylanna joining our team alongside Mark, Sharmila and Jennifer, and you meeting them both. We are confident you will be in good hands.

Sharmila will be working Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

Jennifer Mondays and Tuesdays all day and Friday mornings.

Mark everyday!

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us either by email on info@fellowsdental.co.uk or call us 01323 640345.

Do check out our website for further information on the practice www.fellowsdental.co.uk

In the meantime we would like to wish you all a very Happy  New Year. Thank you for being patient with us during the building works and we look forward to the exciting developments here at the practice. We are proud to be a forward thinking team delivering you a high level of care with enthusiastic, kind and caring clinicians.

With our best wishes

The Team at Fellows Dental Practice.

 

 

Healthy Gums, Healthy Body

Its National Smile Month this month and so we are going to give you some information on reasons to maintain great oral health. The saying goes ‘the mouth is the window to the body’ and when we’re talking about taking care of our teeth, this couldn’t be truer.

One of the benefits of great oral health, is what it can do for our confidence, our career and relationships, but here we are going to talk about the effects of poor oral health.

So what comes to mind here?  Yellow teeth?  How about missing teeth?  Or perhaps breath that even air freshener couldn’t mask?

These may be extreme but the point is this – the repercussions of poor oral health don’t just stop at the mouth.

You wouldn’t ignore bleeding to any part of your body but many people ignore bleeding gums. It’s one of the first and most obvious signs of gum disease, which if left untreated, can cause a whole range of problems. By visiting a dentist as often as they recommend, we can help to nip these things in the bud.

So here we are going to look at some commonly asked questions on how the health of our mouth can affect our general health and why we ask question regards your general health when you come to the dentist.

What problems could poor denal health cause?

Problems which may be caused or made worse by poor dental health include:

  • Heart Disease
  • Strokes
  • Diabetes
  • Giving birth to a premature or low-birth-weight baby
  • Respiratory (lung) disease

How can the health of my mouth affect my heart?

People with gum disease are almost twice as likely to have coronary artery disease than people without gum disease. When people have gum disease, bacteria from the mouth can get into their bloodstream. The bacteria produce protein. This can then affect the heart by causing the platelets in the blood to stick together in the blood vessels of the heart. This can make clots more likely to form. Blood clots can reduce normal blood flow, so that the heart does not get all the nutrients and oxygen it needs.

If the blood flow is badly affected this could lead to a heart attack.

 What is the link between gum disease and strokes?

Several studies have looked at the connection between mouth infections and strokes. They have found that people who have had a stroke are more likely to have gum disease than people who have not had one.

When the bacteria that cause gum disease get into the bloodstream, they produce a protein. This can cause inflammation of the blood vessels, and this can block the blood supply to the brain. This can cause a stroke.

How could diabetes affect my dental health?

People with diabetes are more likely to have gum disease than people without it. This is probably because diabetics are more likely to get infections in general. People who do not know they have diabetes, or whose diabetes is not under control, are especially at risk.

If you do have diabetes it is important that any gum disease is diagnosed, because it can increase your blood sugar. This would put you at risk of diabetic complications.

Also, if you are diabetic, you may find that you heal more slowly. If you have a problem with your gums, or have problems after visits to your dentist, discuss this with your dentist before you have any treatment.

New research has also shown that you are more likely to develop diabetes if you have gum disease.

If you have diabetes, you have an increased risk of losing teeth.

Could gum disease effect my unborn child?

Pregnant women who have gum disease may be over three times more likely to have a baby that is premature and so has a low birth weight. There is a one-in-four chance that a pregnant woman with gum disease will give birth before 35 weeks.

It seems that gum disease raises the levels of the chemicals that bring on labour. Research also suggests that women whose gum disease gets worse during pregnancy have an even higher risk of having a premature baby.

Having gum disease treated properly during pregnancy can reduce the risk of a premature birth.

How could bateria in the mouth effect my lungs?

Bacterial chest infections are thought to be caused by breathing in fine droplets from the throat and mouth into the lungs. This can cause infections, such as pneumonia, or could make an existing condition worse. People with gum disease have more bacteria in their mouths and may therefore be more likely to get chest infections.

What are the tell-tale signs of gum disease that I should look out for?

Visit your dentist or hygienist if you have any of the symptoms of gum disease. These can include:

  • Inflammation of the gums, causing them to be red, swollen and to bleed easily, especially when brushing
  • An unpleasant taste in your mouth
  • Loose teeth
  • Regular mouth infections

Do I need to tell the dentist about changes to my general health?

Always tell your dentist about any changes to your general health. It is especially important to tell them if you are pregnant or have heart disease, diabetes, lung disease or have ever had a stroke. You also need to tell them about any medicines you are taking as these can affect both your treatment and the health of your mouth.

Does gum disease run in families?

Although there is some evidence that gum disease runs in families, the main cause is the plaque that forms on the surface of your teeth. To prevent gum disease, you need to make sure you remove all the plaque from your teeth every day by brushing and cleaning in between your teeth.

How can I prevent gum disease from getting worse?

If you have gum disease, your dentist or hygienist will usually give your teeth a thorough clean to remove any scale or tartar. This may take a number of sessions with the dentist or hygienist.

They will also show you how to remove the soft plaque yourself, by cleaning all the surfaces of your teeth thoroughly at home. Plaque is a sticky film of bacteria which forms on the teeth every day. For more information see our website section on gum disease.

Gum disease is never cured. But as long as you keep up the home-care you have been taught you can slow down its progress and even stop it altogether. You must make sure you remove plaque every day, and go for regular check-ups with the dentist and hygienist, as often as they recommend.

Can exercise help to prevent gum disease?

A recent study has shown that people who stay fit and healthy are 40% less likely to develop tooth-threatening gum infections that could lead to gum disease. It also found that not exercising, not keeping to a normal body weight and unhealthy eating habits made a person much more likely to get advanced gum disease.

If you are serious about your health – and your teeth – you will need to exercise, eat a healthy, balanced diet and keep to a normal body weight.

Can smoking affect my teeth and gums?

Smoking can make gum disease much worse.  People who smoke are more likely to produce bacterial plaque that leads to gum disease. The gums are affected because smoking means you have less oxygen in your bloodstream, so the infected gums do not heal. Smoking can also lead to tooth staining, tooth loss because of gum disease, bad breath, and in more severe cases mouth cancer.

For more information, see our website – www.fellowsdental.co.uk or call to see us to book an appointment with one of our dentists or hygienists – 01323 640 345.

THINK before you GRAB a SOFT DRINK!

Think before you grab a soft drink!

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The term ‘soft drink’ covers a vast array of beverages from carbonated, sports and energy drinks to fruit juices, dilutables and bottled waters. In the UK, we consume around 14 billion litres of soft drinks each year, with children and adolescents being most likely to consume more than any other age group.

READ ON or call us on 01323 640345 for further information from FELLOWS DENTAL PRACTICE

The bad guys

Carbonated drinks are made when gas is dissolved in them (carbonation) making them fizzy. Carbonated, as well as sports/energy drinks, also generally contain high levels of acids and sugars making them extremely damaging to our teeth as they cause dental erosion and decay.

An example of this is Coca Cola, one of the most popular soft drinks, which contains a massive 53g of sugar in a 500ml bottle equivalent to 14 teaspoons! Figure 1 shows the sugar content in some other popular soft drinks:

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Drink Sugar Content
Coca Cola (500ml bottle) 53g (13 teaspoons)
Lucozade (500ml bottle) 43.5g (11 teaspoons)
Red Bull Energy Drink (250ml can) 27g (7 teaspoons)
Tropicana Original Orange With Extra Juicy Bits (250ml serving) 25g (6 teaspoons)

Figure 1: Sugar content in some popular soft drinks (Data from BBC)

Teenagers are most at risk as shown by a 2016 study which found that 94% of adolescents had a consumption of free sugars above the 10% of total energy intake recommendations. In this study, the main food contributor to free sugars was ‘carbonated, soft and isotonic drinks!’

Here’s a reminder of the recommended maximum sugar intake per day for children:

Age

Maximum recommended sugar intake per day

Teaspoons

4-6yrs 19g 5
7-10yrs 24g 6
From 11yrs 30g 7

How can the damaging effect of sugary and acidic drinks be made worse?

  1. High volume and regular intakes
  2. No tooth brushing: this leaves bacteria on the teeth, which are able to react with the sugars to cause dental decay

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  1. Brushing/grinding teeth immediately after: the acids in the drink make the tooth surface soft; this soft surface becomes heavily damaged and quickly worn away when we brush/grind our teeth after an acidic drink
  2. Consuming these drinks when we have a dry mouth: saliva is the body’s defence against acid and sugar attacks on the teeth. When we have a dry mouth there is little saliva and therefore little defence against sugars and acids. This is a huge concern as it is when we have a dry mouth that we are perhaps most likely to grab a soft drink!
  3. Swilling drinks
  4. Intakes at bedtime or during the night

What about diet and sugar-free carbonated drinks?

There’s increasing pressure within the soft drinks industry to create ‘healthier’ options in the form of ‘sugar free’ and ‘diet’ alternatives. These options are now slowly becoming more popular with 49% of carbonates sold in 2014 being low and no calorie.

However, before you grab yourself one of these ‘sugar-free’ alternatives, it’s important to bear in mind that though they help reduce obesity, diabetes and the risk of tooth decay compared to their ‘full fat’ sugar equivalents, they are still extremely acidic. Therefore, dental erosion is still a huge concern.

Are fruit juices a good alternative?

Fruit juices are known for having beneficial effects on our general health with the Government recommending that a 150ml portion of juice can count as one of your five-a-day. However, like carbonated drinks, fruit juice contains acids and sugar which can be damaging to our teeth. Therefore, we still need to consider some recommendations before grabbing the ‘healthy’ fruit juice.

“Like carbonated drinks, fruit juice contains acids and sugar which can be damaging to our teeth.”

Here’s a good way to get the benefits of fruit juice while minimising the damage to our teeth: drink one portion of 150ml fruit juice a day with breakfast and brush your teeth either before or around 30 minutes after breakfast.

Bottled waters

Bottled waters are seen as the healthiest option by many of us, however we must be careful when selecting them. Many manufacturers are adding sugars and flavourings to help bottled water to taste better and to increase its appeal. For example, Volvic Touch of Fruit contains around 24g of sugar in a 500ml bottle (that’s equivalent to 6 teaspoons – WOW!).

“The worry is that we could be ditching carbonated drinks for what we consider a ‘healthy’ alternative – which is in fact sugary water!”

When selecting a healthy option we should be going for unflavoured plain bottled waters, still or sparkling. While sparkling waters are carbonated, they have not been found to have the same damaging effect on teeth as other fizzy drinks. Alternatively we can go to the tap for our water – this is the cheapest option and may also, in some parts of the UK, come with added health benefits for our teeth in the form of fluoride.

Here’s some tips to consider when reaching for bottled water:

  1. Avoid flavoured waters: these usually contain sugars – read the packaging!
  2. Drink plain water daily: current recommendations are we should get around 2L of water a day
  3. Consider drinking water from the tap
  4. Plain water should be the main drink we reach for between meals and at bedtime or during the night.

Six top tips to help protect ourselves against sugary and acidic drinks

  1. Reduce our daily intake of acidic and sugary drinks
  2. Good tooth brushing: brush your teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste – spitting and not rinsing afterwards. This removes bacteria to prevent dental decay
  3. Toothbrushing should be carried out before or approximately 30 minutes after an acidic drink

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  1. Limit intake of acidic and sugary drinks to meal times: the food we eat helps defend against attacks on the teeth. It is important that we try and stick to three meals/day to limit sugar attacks
  2. Consider using a straw and do not swill the drinks: the damaging effect of these drinks is increased the longer these fluids are in contact with the teeth. A straw can help carry the damaging drinks past our teeth

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  1. Avoid acidic or sugary drinks at bedtime or during the night: we should not eat/drink anything except water after brushing our teeth at night.

Soft drinks are regularly consumed by a large number of the population – particularly a high proportion of adolescents! The choices you make about which soft drinks you choose for yourself and your children can have a detrimental impact on both your general and oral health. Plain, unflavoured bottled water or tap water is the healthiest choice for our bodies and our teeth.

So, remember to think before you grab a soft drink!

Call us today to book an appointment with one of our Dentists or Hygenists to have you full dental check up and advise on how to reduce decay to your teeth.

 

 

 

Upgrade to Software – exciting improvements ahead

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                     please bear with us!

 

 

 

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Please ensure we have your uptodate E-MAIL & TELEPHONE NUMBERS

At the end of September we are upgrading our Dental Software.

Thank you for your patience and we are sorry for any disruption this may cause. We are sure that in the long run it will be a much better system for all our patients and the practice.

We will be able to remind you of your appointmnets more effectively via text message and email and generally be able to communiate much more efficiently with you.

One of the BIG IMPROVEMENTS will be NO MORE yellow medical history forms to fill in as you will be able to update your records here at the practice electronically!

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Your Dental Checkup

Dental Checkup – What Does the Dentist Look For?

 

A dental checkup or examination appointment is a very important opportunity for a dentist to identify any early signs of dental problems.  Most dental problems when found early can be treated quickly and inexpensively.

Dental decay is often difficult to see with the naked eye, so X rays are used to see beneath the surface of the tooth along with checking for bone loss due to gum disease. X rays in dentistry are very safe and have less radiation exposure than a short flight. You can also ask your dentist why the X ray is being taken as the need for an X ray is due to a clinical need. we have switched to digital X rays which means you can also see the images on a computer screen immediately. The X ray may be a full image of an individual tooth, called a peri apical (PA) or a collection of the side view of the back teeth, called bite wings. Less frequently a full X rays of the jaw and teeth is taken, called an OPG or OPT. Considering that the radiation risk is so low, having regular X rays is an accurate way to spot dental problems.

Commonly dental decay between the teeth, underneath fillings or crowns is monitored.  The dentist also checks the bone quality and quantity around the tooth because when gum disease has been present for some months and left untreated it causes the bone that supports a tooth to start shrinking. This effect is irreversible and this advances can even lead to tooth loss. This is the number one reason people lose teeth in the UK.

With oral cancer rates significantly rising, a dentist or hygienist will carefully check all of the lining of your mouth and tongue to check for signs of oral cancer and if necessary refer you to a specialist for further investigation.

Teeth grinding is particularly common these days and can be linked to stress as a cause. The wear effects on the teeth are irreversible and the jaw can become permanently damaged if left untreated.

Even though a dental check up may appear a chore it can potentially save you thousands of pounds in more expensive treatments – and even save your life! There is more and more scientific evidence emerging about the link between oral health and your overall health. At the end of a check up, your dentist will inform you how long you should wait before the next checkup. This decision is based on your risk factors and can range from 3 months through to a year. Children need more regular visits than an adult generally.

In summary, top 5 things a dentist checks for:

  • Dental decay
  • Gum disease – leading cause of tooth loss in the UK
  • Oral cancer
  • Teeth grinding
  • Teeth crowding

At the end of your check up appointment, if any further treatment is required, a written plan of treatment will be made. This outlines costs, number of visits and details of the treatment. If you agree to the treatment after understanding the risks and benefits, then you will be asked to sign the treatment plan before any active treatment begins. Should there be any changes required to the plan then a new treatment plan will be drawn up.

Some people feel that a dentist visit is only required when they experience a dental problem, however with more evidence of a link between dental disease with general disease, perhaps its time you make a dental appointment today?

Please do give us a call to book in with Mark or Sharmila 01323 640 345

or visit our website for further information www.fellowsdental.co.uk

 

 

Top Sports Stars encouraged to brush up ahead of the Rio Olympics

We’ve had Euro 2016, Wimbledon and the Tour de France but with the Rio Olympics approaching, sports men and women are being reminded to take extra care of their oral health, as research shows athletes are at greater risk of tooth decay and dental erosion.

A report by a team of dental researchers discovered significantly higher tooth erosion in triathletes than in non-athletes. In addition, the researchers found that athletes who engaged in more weekly training had more cavities than those who trained less. The triathletes’ high carbohydrate consumption, including sports drinks, gels, and bars during training, can lower the mouth’s pH below 5.5, which means there is more acid in the mouth.

After the London 2012 Olympics, research published in the British Journal of Sports medicine discovered that more than half (55 per cent) of the athletes had tooth decay. It also revealed more than three in four athletes had gingivitis, which is an early stage of gum disease, and 15 per cent had signs of periodontitis, which is an irreversible gum infection.

Those who are actively involved in sport are in a great position to begin with, as those who exercise are less likely to develop tooth-threatening problems that could lead to gum disease. Many other links between good oral health and good overall health have also been made, including diabetes, lung diseases and heart problems. However, athletes may feel as though they require plenty of energy drinks, which are packed full of sugar, across a prolonged period of time to get them through their respective sports. It is the sustained consumption of too many sports and energy drinks that puts athletes are at risk of dental erosion.

Dental erosion is the loss of tooth enamel caused by acid attacks, a process that can be triggered by consuming fizzy drinks too often. Enamel is the hard, protective coating of the tooth, and if it is worn away, the dentine underneath becomes exposed and teeth can look discoloured and become sensitive. Tooth decay happens when sugar reacts with the bacteria in plaque. Sugars from fizzy energy drinks stimulate the formation of acids that attack the teeth and destroy the enamel. Tooth decay causes cavities and results in the need for fillings, and can also result in tooth loss.

If you are active and take part in sport regularly, it is important to limit the amount of times you have anything acidic or sugary. Using a straw to help drinks go to the back of the mouth will help limit the amount of time a fizzy drink will be in contact with teeth. If the use of energy drinks, particularly amongst children, continues to rise, dental health problems will develop and persist throughout adulthood.

For further advice please speak to your DentistMark Fellows and Sharmila Sarin are here to help and advise you.

Does your jaw hurt?

Do you often awaken in the morning to find that your jaw is sore or that your neck and shoulders feel tense? Perhaps you suffer from frequent headaches that tend to begin in the area surrounding your temples. These symptoms are common in individuals with nighttime teeth grinding and daily jaw clenching, or bruxism and temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD).

 

It’s been estimated that up to 30% of adults will experience TMD at some point in their lives.

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The condition itself isn’t usually serious, and the symptoms it can cause – including pain, jaw joint clicking or popping, and difficulties eating – usually only last a few months before getting better. However, these symptoms can last longer and can significantly lower quality of life and be very painful –  but don’t panic, as your dentist can help with treatment that is typically  non-invasive, affordable and easily accessible.

What are the symptoms?

TMD can cause:

  • clicking, popping or grating noises as you chew or move your mouth
  • muscle pain around the jaw
  • pain in front of the ear that may spread to the cheek, ear and temple
  • difficulty opening the mouth – the jaw may feel tight, as if it is stuck, making eating difficult
  • headache or migraine
  • earache or a “buzzing” or blocked sensation in the ear
  • pain in other areas of the body – such as neckache or backache

These symptoms may lead to related symptoms, such as disturbed sleep.

What are the causes?

Possible causes of TMD include:

  • clenching your jaw or grinding your teeth during sleep (bruxism) – which overworks the jaw muscles and puts pressure on the joint (often caused by stress)
  • wear and tear of the inside of the jaw joint – usually caused by osteoarthritis
  • injury to the jaw joint – for example, after a blow to the face or surgery
  • stress – some people may inherit increased sensitivity to pain or stress
  • uneven bite – for example, when new fillings, dental crowns or dentures are fitted
  • specific diseases – TMD may be associated with specific diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout or fibromyalgia

However, some people may develop TMD without an obvious cause being found.

What to do……

We can help with the symptoms and possibly the source of the problem. 

Please do mention to your Dentist if you have any of these symptoms.

DON’T stay quietly in pain – talk to your Dentist at Fellows Dental Practice about any symptoms you may be having.

 

 

 

Sharmila’s Ultra Challenge

On Saturday 28th May our lovely dentist Sharmila set off very early to walk the Ultra Challenge, London to Brighton.  Starting in Richmond, West London on Saturday morning, she walked 100km of paths, trails, and roads  to get to the Brighton finish line – where an overwhelming sense of elation awaited her.sharmila map

 

 

Sharmila completed the challenge in just over 25 hours …WOW! And no blisters and a huge smile on her face.

So far Sharmila has raised £1,350 for a fantastic charity – Dogs for Good – a UK based charity that “provides training assistance dogs to support adults and children with physical disabilities and children with autism”. Sharmila would like to say a BIG thank you to everyone that donated – you have been so generous and it is very much appreciated!!

sharmila finish line

It’s not too late to make a donation – anything is greatly appreciated! To find out more visit Sharmila’s just-giving page: https://www.justgiving.com/Sharmila-Bayliss

We’re all so proud of you Sharmila, not only are you are great dentist but you have raised loads of money for a great cause, and completed and mega challenge – Extremely well done from all of us at Fellows Dental Practice.

 

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Finalist for Dental Team of the Year

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The Team at Fellows Dental Practice are so proud to have been nominated for the prestigious Dental Awards and we made it to the final of the Team of the Year.

We are one of three practices South of London and the only one in East Sussex to have made the final.  There were hundreds who entered, making this the biggest and best Dental Awards to date.

The Dental Awards is the UK’s premier annual awards scheme, developed to recognise and reward the very highest standards in UK dentistry & oral healthcare through outstanding individuals and teams whose commitment and drive continues to raise standards throughout UK dentistry.

Sponsored by market-leading businesses serving the dental profession and supported by key dental associations and all the leading dentistry magazines, the Dental Awards are the most coveted awards program serving the sector, being seen as the gold standard. Winning one represents a pinnacle in the career of any individual or practice.

Our nomination is a wonderful acknowledgement of our achievements.  At Fellows Dental Practice, our patients are at the center of everything we do.  We work together as a team to ensure everyone has a lovely journey through the practice and the quality of the dentistry we provide is not simply high but also how we would wish to be treated ourselves.

We are very proud of our team – they are dedicated and hard working, yet a fun bunch to work with! We were delighted to have made it to the final, we didn’t win but we did have a lot of fun up in Birmingham celebrating in style with other excellent dental practices.

Our team is Mark Fellows (Owner and Dentist); Sharmila Sarin (Associate Dentist); Catherine Fellows (Co-owner Practice Manager and Dental Nurse); Jennifer Kinnish (Hygienist); Kelly Hardy, Stephanie Mainstone, Melissa Ringsell and Amy McGowan (Dental Nurses and Reception Team).

 

Thank you for all your support.

Monkey’s Family Visit the Dentist!

Monkeys Family Visit the Dentist

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The team at Fellows Dental are all very child friendly, we believe that children should come to the dentist and have a happy fun time. There is no need to fear the dentist like some people may have done in the past.  Children’s teeth need looking after from the moment they appear, so book your child in and let them discover how looking after your teeth can be fun!

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Monkeys Family Visit the Dentist is a  20-page realistic, photographically-based children’s storybook to prepare children for visiting the dentist. In this story, Monkey and his sister have a check-up with their family dentist. It’s a great introduction to visiting the dentist, familiarising children with the dentist’s surgery, the equipment and the process of having their teeth checked.  If your child is frightened or cautious of the dentist ask us for one of our Monkey books, read it to them, discuss it with them.Feedback has told us that visits to the dentist have been made much easier following this.

The author, Helen Sadler, of the book writes books for various different medically related situations. Promoted by a feeling of bewilderment and fear when her daughter was admitted to hospital, Helen has written books to help children overcome and be prepared for different medical situations.

In our waiting room at Fellows Dental Practice we have plenty of toys and books for children to play with whilst they are waiting to see their Dentist, Mark or Sharmila.  The book Monkeys family visits the Dentist is also available to read in the waiting room and we have Monkey Dental Activity Packs available if you would like them.  We want to ensure that your families visit is a relaxing, calm and happy one.  In both our surgeries there are television screens on the ceiling, we have a large selection of DVDs available to choose from, or you can bring your own favourite with you.

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We have stickers for everyone and fun toothbrushes available for purchase at reception.

With National Smile Month coming up why not have your picture taken with our big cheesy hold up smile and join our Facebook gallery!

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Who’d have thought that going to the dentist was so much fun!